African Woman Attacked in India

LA Times

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The Body that Enables the Spirit

Yet the last item in this sequence is the one that he is driving toward: “It is sown a natural body [psychikon sōma], it is raised a spiritual body [pneumatikon sōma]” (v. 44, NIV). This is the nub of his argument. This last contrast, however, presents a vexing problem for translators (cf. 2:14, where the same contrast occurs). The phrase psychikon sōma is notoriously difficult to translate into English. The NRSV’s translation (“physical body”) is especially unfortunate, for it reinstates precisely the dualistic dichotomy between physical and spiritual that Paul is struggling to overcome. In any case, psychikon certainly does not mean “physical.” Furthermore, although pneumatikon sōma is easier to translate, “spiritual body” sounds like an oxymoron. What sense are we to make of this?
By far the most graceful translation of verse 44, and the one that best conveys the meaning of Paul’s sentence, is found in the Jerusalem Bible: “When it is sown it embodies the soul, when it is raised it embodies the spirit. If the soul has its own embodiment, so does the spirit have its own embodiment.” That is Paul’s point: our mortal bodies embody the psychē (“soul”), the animating force of our present existence, but the resurrection body will embody the divinely given pneuma (“spirit”). It is to be a “spiritual body” not in the sense that it is somehow made out of spirit and vapors, but in the sense that it is determined by the spirit and gives the spirit form and local habitation.
Hays, R. B. (1997). First Corinthians (p. 272). Louisville, KY: John Knox Press.

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1/5 of Lawyers have a serious drinking problem

Wonkblog

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We Don’t Age Out of Sexuality

Michelle Van Loon

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Post-Evangelical Seekers

Pete Enns

Some would say we lost our faith, but the reality is we still desperately seek God and long for the ability to believe in his existence without having to bury our heads in the sand. God seems largely absent, indifferent, or simply on vacation to us anymore. I am currently reading Inspiration and Incarnation, but I’m wondering if you have written anything specifically on prayer and why most of the time it seems a fruitless exercise?

It is indeed a very lonely journey and we feel like lepers in a colony of old friends. We no longer fit into the “church” camp or the “secular” camp. We are in “no man’s” land. Our friends and family within the church wring their hands with a combination of concern, pity, withdrawal and (what feels like) concealed judgment.

Not wanting to be argumentative, combative, or insulting we have simply learned how to remain quiet and pretend around them. Thus, the reason for our slow withdrawal. It has felt like grieving the death of multiple loved ones. We live in a tiny community and all of the churches preach a conservative and traditional message. It has been hard to find anyone out there struggling as we are.

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If you use Jesus as a fish finder you may discover you want him more than fish

The Story-verse and the Matter-verse

Three weeks ago we explored finding Jesus in the story-verse and the implications of his turning water to wine. As we see in this video of Jim Carrey  at the Golden Globes the uneasy reality between our story-verse and the matter-verse haunts even the wealthiest, most influential, most beautiful, members of our society. We are gripped by the story-verse, it takes possession of our lives while at the same time we are haunted by the materialist story-verse that demands that the matter-verse will have its way rendering all story-verses unreal. Our only defense against nihilism is “I don’t feel like it today!”

Bertrand Russell’s eloquence dwarfs “the new atheists” could bring it to a point.

‘I believe that when I die I shall rot, and nothing of my ego will survive.’4 Again, he affirmed his conviction that no fire, no heroism, no intensity of thought and feeling, can preserve an individual life beyond the grave; that all the labours of the ages, all the devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius are destined for extinction in the vast death of the solar system, and that the whole temple of man’s achievement must inevitably be buried beneath the debris of a universe in ruins.5

Stott, John (2012-12-28). Why I Am a Christian (Kindle Locations 875-880). InterVarsity Press. Kindle Edition.

Because of this matter-verse–story-verse Jesus’ miracles are both dismissed out of hand as a story-verse violation and of vital interest to our appreciation of who he is. Is the matter-verse really safe from him if he turned water into wine or walked out of that tomb?

Preaching by the Sea Continue reading

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Bertrand Russell’s matter-verse–story-verse

‘I believe that when I die I shall rot, and nothing of my ego will survive.’4 Again, he affirmed his conviction that no fire, no heroism, no intensity of thought and feeling, can preserve an individual life beyond the grave; that all the labours of the ages, all the devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius are destined for extinction in the vast death of the solar system, and that the whole temple of man’s achievement must inevitably be buried beneath the debris of a universe in ruins.5

Stott, John (2012-12-28). Why I Am a Christian (Kindle Locations 875-880). InterVarsity Press. Kindle Edition.

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